6.25.2009

Shane Victorino TTM: is this a success?

A while back we sent a through the mail (TTM) autograph request to Shane Victorino because Lucy, along with many kids, likes him. Also because he fit in with our overall 2008 Allen & Ginter autograph quest. Mr. Victorino's Phillies staff assistant neatly addressed the envelope; returned the SASE; returned the A&G card still tucked between two index cards (above); and included this signed postcard instead:

The letter is written as if it is from Mr. V, and says, "I want you to know I appreciate every piece of mail I receive, but it is getting more and more difficult to answer it.

Please accept this signed photocard as an answer to your letter." In the past, Lucy sent requests to a couple of Phillies, including Cole Hamels and Jamie Moyer, and also received signed postcards in return. We took a stab at Victorino and the A&G because Jamie Moyer also signed and returned the baseball card she sent to him, although later, in a separate mailing. So we tried. See, we'll do anything for Allen & Ginter.

Here's the scenario we assume: Shane Victorino signs/initials countless postcards. An assistant deals with the rest. If we were cynical, we'd assume the assistant signs the postcards, too. So, inquiring minds need to know: all in all, would you count this as a TTM success?

9 comments:

Section 36 said...

Depends on your goal. I consider anything returnd to me a success...postcad, fan club info, photocopy of media guide, whatever.

But, you didn't get the A&G you wanted.

How about a draw?

Dinged Corners said...

We agree. Getting something back is good. And the Phillies probably do get quite a bit of mail. :)

Carl Crawford Cards said...

Yeah, it's a success. Maybe not a HR, he signed the A&G type success, but a double off the wall nonetheless. Congrats!

paulsrandomstuff said...

I choose to believe that the signed Phillies photocards are real autographs.

For the superstar players, they send back postcards with facsimile autographs. I can't see them deciding that Chase Utley's postcard should have the facsimile autograph while some intern has to learn how to sign Shane Victorino's name.

If you believe you got a real autograph, count it as a success. Otherwise, count it as a draw.

zman40 said...

I would count it as a success, too. This was a very common practice during the late '80s and early '90s. Back then, you were lucky to get a postcard that was actually signed. More than half of the time, they were the fake signatures like they had on Topps cards the last few years. The worst part was that some player's notes tried to pass the fake sigs off as real ones. I think I have a Ron Gant, Dave Justice, Jerry Rice, and Karl Malone of that variety.

So, while it would have been awesome to get the A&G signed, it could have also been a worse outcome.

Mark's Ephemera said...

Success. I'm still trying to figure out why Mr. V is poking out from behind the vertical blinds at your house (top image).

dc said...

M, Mr. V is peeking out from between two index cards. The vertical blinds reference is making me nostalgic for my mother's living room in Queens.

Laurens said...

As long as you get an actual autograph and not one preprinted or even ghost-signed, I'd consider it a success.

I think I got Pat Burrell, Kevin Millwood, Brett Myers and Cole Hamels on Phillies' photocards that were actually signed by those players.

I don't think I ever 'bothered' Jimmy Rollins in the mail and wrote to Ryan Howard and got a postcard with a preprint.

If you want to write to a young Phillies player to have your item signed, do so before they start using the photocard route.

--David said...

I agree with the 'double-off-the-wall' type of success. I wonder if you'd get a different response if you asked in the off-season...