1.30.2011

Essence of vintage.

And by essence of vintage, we mean fake.

But we also mean vintage STYLE conveying retro cool and cardboard aesthetic. There are whole sets that manage to do this, of course, from Ginter to Goodwin to Heritage, but what follows are random cards that we've come upon through trades or nickel bin finds. We don't have the sets or even many other cards in the sets.

In the first case, we think there's only three other ballplayers to be had in this whole Topps (in the good old T.C.G. days) set. This is Topps "Who Am I?":
This card may in fact be cheating because it really is old--although not old enough to be contemporary with Babe: 1967.  George Herman all combed and colorized:
The 1967 "Who Am I?" cards that still have the disguise coating on them are the ones to have for real value, of course--it would be worth $500 or more don't you think--
but we like that we can actually see the Bambino on ours. So for us this card is NOT truly vintage in its Ruthiness, but rather in its status as a sixties card. It's only ESSENCE of vintage as a Ruth card.

Let's move on to the next card, which is much less confusing: Upper Deck "Legends of New York" picturing Yogi with his Mets jersey and a splorg of orange (we have several from this set thanks to the dayferminster):
Yogi is very straightforward. The card contains bits of essence of vintage: the old Mr. Met, black and white photo, and words like "legend."

Now, here are floaty heads from the UD Vintage series--my frends, does this not thoroughly capture Floaty Head Essence?:
almost all of us look a little mad, don't we?
Then there's the "Turn Back the Clock" series. Here's Gil Hodges, gentleman and Mets manager:
And a Bowman Jackie Robinson. Sometimes Bowman does shiny reallllly well:
So! There's some essence of vintage. What are your favorite fake vintagey cards?

2 comments:

night owl said...

I think there's so much fake vintage out now that I've O'Ded on the whole thing. (I have a faint interest in Heritage this year, but I have a feeling it's fleeting).

The "new" vintage for me is oddball cards from the '70s and '80s -- cards issued by stores and gas stations.

If a card company were to make a whole set that looked like it came from a gas station in 1985, I would buy the whole thing.

dc said...

Hi Greg. We kind of agree except we do get sucked in by vintageyness fairly often. But in theory we agree with you.